The Road to Hella: Why Silicon Valley Doesn’t Really Matter Anymore.

It’s no secret that I’ve long hated the San Francisco area. These reasons, of course, extend beyond the more obvious, superficial stuff.

While I have a sincere and deep-seated animosity for Giants and Golden State Warrior fans, streets that perpetually reek of urine and the gratuitous usage of the word hella, the real reason I dislike NoCal is that it’s one of the most insular, provincial and out of touch places on the planet.

The bubble surrounding Silicon Valley isn’t limited to ridiculous valuations on ridiculous startups, but rather, to the prevalent mindset of a place that’s too busy worrying about what’s happening along Sand Hill Road or South of Market to take a step back and realize what’s going on in the rest of the world.

Read More

HiQ Lawsuit: When LinkedIn Loses, Everybody Wins.

Throughout its history, LinkedIn has slowly, albeit deliberately, evolved from what used to be a fairly innocuous social network into one of the internet’s most extensive sources of personal data.

Some of this, of course, is inevitable, given LinkedIn’s longevity on the market – it’s been collecting personally identifiable data (er, “professional information”) for well over a dozen years now, on hundreds of millions of individual users all over the world. Much of this has been perpetuated by people like career coaches and, yes, recruitment bloggers.

Read More

The G Spot: Google Gets Into the HR Tech Game, Because Why Not?

For a function long consigned to being something of a technological backwater, the very thought that the most ubiquitous, transformative and, arguably, the most innovative company in the history of technology has thrown its hat in the recruiting ring is, well, unbelievable.

So, if today’s official launch of Google Hire, the Mountain View based behemoth’s first foray into the HR Technology industry, causes some sort of cognitive dissonance and disbelief, well, that makes two of us.

Read More

Something You Forgot: Sentiment Analysis for HR and Recruiting

Despite our near obsessive fixation on “employee engagement,” this term remains largely amorphous and highly ambiguous, a subjective subject at best.

Inherently, HR knows that an engaged workforce is more satisfied in their jobs, more productive at work, and generally stick around for longer tenures and lower pay.

These are all outcomes, we can agree, by which HR should be both managed and measured.

Read More

The Neverending Story: The 2017 State of the Recruiting Internet.

If you’ve never been to Terranea just south of Los Angeles, it’s hard to describe one of the most picturesque, and privileged, places in the world.

To get there, you have to go through the industrial cities of Torrance and San Pedro, past decaying factories and dilapidated houses, blue collar turned barrio, like so much of South Bay surrounding it.

You climb up a hill, and turn onto a two way, winding road, and suddenly, you’re coasting along the Pacific Ocean; if you’re lucky, you’ll see humpback whales or the occasional school of dolphins somewhere out in there in the azure waters.

Read More

Word Count.

I haven’t written on this site for quite some time; normally, I go through the motions of cross posting content from Recruiting Daily, which gets all my original content since, well, they pay my salary, but recently that platform has become ubiquitous enough where it seems a bit redundant these days.

The truth of the matter is, I feel like I owe the world a giant apology for underachieving of late. I know that’s not entirely the case, but for the first time in my life, really, the work has finally caught up to me. It’s not so much that I’ve lost my passion, or am burnt out – it’s just that I have suddenly found myself unable to pull all nighters any more. The single time of the day I could previously catch up and be productive has become impossible for me. The reason, of course, is because I am getting old.

Read More

A Lesson Learned.

If you know me, you know how hard it is for me to keep my damn mouth shut. It’s against my very nature to stay silent, particularly when I’m provoked. And yet, for much of the past year, that’s exactly what I’ve had to do when shit when south for some reason I’m still not entirely sure of, and I basically found myself in the first act of an episode of Snapped.

I will not comment any further on that issue, other than to say I think my restraint has somewhat redeemed an unredeemable situation in which that silence was too often construed as guilt, but even acknowledging the situation would have somehow given it credibility.

Read More

Predictions That Probably Won’t Happen: 2017 Talent Trends.

The thing about talent trends posts is that if it were possible to predict the future of recruiting and HR, we’d probably have figured out some way to make it suck a little less.

Of course, the glacial pace of change in these parts means that for the indeterminate present, 2017 Is shaping up to be same shit, different year.

I’m aware that trends posts are, well, trendy – and acknowledge that there’s no real need for me (or anyone else) to contribute more content to this canon of crap.

Read More

Your Fault: Don’t Blame Glassdoor for Your Crap Company Culture.

There are few companies able to generate more mainstream media coverage than Glassdoor1, who has a long track record of using the massive amounts of proprietary data across their site to generate some analytics and insights into what’s really going on in the world of work.

While employers may bitch about the negative reviews (and their lack of ability to respond without paying a premium for the privilege), Glassdoor’s anecdotal evidence is far less interesting – or actionable – than the data the site collects in aggregate.

Read More

Why Google Is The Ultimate Spyware.

A Google product manager filed a lawsuit in California Superior Court yesterday, alleging the company’s strict internal confidentiality policies represent a breach of California labor laws.

The lawsuit alleges that Google has implemented an enterprise wide “spying program” for current employees to voluntarily report coworkers and colleagues suspected of leaking confidential information or trade secrets.

Read More

%d bloggers like this: